24th May 2008

    Top 10 Photos

    Farida at Farida’s Azerbaijani Cookbook tagged us last month for Top 10 Photos, wherein we post our favorites from the blog. Somehow we totally missed this in the transition to WordPress, so here we go — better late than never!

    Brussels Sprouts and Golden Beets

    Brussels Sprouts and Golden Beets — this picture won me over not only for the gorgeous colors, but also for the fact that as a life-long Brussels sprouts HATER, I couldn’t believe how crunchy and flavorful the dish was. It made me a convert.

    Roasted Beets

    Continuing the beet theme, this Roasted Beet Salad with Orange and Cumin actually converted Lisa into a red-beet lover, even though she still thinks they “kinda taste like dirt”. I’m amazed I was able to plate these without getting beet juice *everywhere*.

    Not only was this Tofu with Greens and Noodles delicious, but I was able to use the “twist-and-place” method to get the noodles to look less sloppy.

    Garden Vegetable Lasagna

    I love the veggies just popping out of this Garden Style Lasagna. The only thing I don’t like about this picture is the little half-noodle on the top.

    Sangria

    Every time I look at this picture I get thirsty. What makes this one stand out for me is the fact that for once, since we concocted the Sangria during the day, I was able to use natural light. I love the shadow in the background, and that I was able to angle the orange slice to pick up the light shining through it.

    Burmese Chicken Curry

    Lisa had just bought this serving dish the night before we made this Burmese Chicken Curry, and to me the color of the sauce and the dish itself complemented each other nicely. And hooray for cilantro.

    Quinoa

    I’m including this Quinoa with Butternut Squash and Carrot Stew because I love the colors, and because I actually took the photo the next day, using leftovers. I was really disappointed with the way the photos came out the night that I cooked the dish, so not only was I able to take my time the next day, but, like the Sangria, I got to take advantage of natural light.

    Bread

    Why this one? Because I made bread, dammit, and not only did it look like a real loaf, it tasted great!

    When Lisa made this Lahmajoun it definitely earned her points with the Armenian side of the family. And provided us with delicious leftovers to pull out of the freezer for weeks.

    Finally, I have to include this one, my first post that appeared on TasteSpotting. The dish itself wasn’t totally spectacular, but I while cutting the rolled chicken breasts the resemblance to sushi maki inspired me to plate the dish as sushi, with orzo standing in for the rice.

    Whew! One thing I noticed when trying to scrounge up 10 photos that I liked is that I can totally tell the difference in photos that I took in 3 seconds versus the ones that I took a few minutes to think about plating and composition a bit before actually snapping away. Unfortunately, I don’t always have that luxury, as it’s usually pretty late in the evening when we finally sit down to eat, and hunger takes precedence!

    Thanks for the tag, Farida!

    Print This Recipe

    posted in Food Photography, Site | 3 Comments

    22nd May 2008

    Red Curry Beef and Mushrooms

    A new recipe from Great Bowls of Fire for us tonight — this one was nice and spicy! Thin strips of beef are stir-fried with peppers, mushrooms, and snap peas, and drowned in a sauce of coconut milk, chicken broth, and soy sauce. Filling and delicious!

    Chris says:

    Whoa — this is spicier than I was expecting!

    Lisa says:

    Don’t be a baby… it’s a lot less intense with the rice.

    Chris says:

    Hey, I’m the one who likes spicy, remember? I just meant I had my chili sauce at the ready and don’t think I’ll need to add as much as usual.

    Lisa says:

    While you’ve been jibber-jabbing about spicy foods, I’ve been enjoying my dinner.. mmm, so good! I love the coconut milk flavor.

    Chris says:

    Agreed. If this dinner was a song by Kansas, it’d be “Curry on Wayward Son”.

    Lisa says:

    So, I’ve learned to live with your puns, but what the heck does that even mean?

    Chris says:

    No clue. Okay, I’m going to finish eating this deliciousness.

    Red Curry Beef and Mushrooms
    1 tbsp peanut oil
    1 lb top round
    1 red bell pepper, seeded and cut into slivers
    8 oz cremini mushrooms, sliced
    2 tsp minced ginger root
    3 cloves garlic, minced
    3 tsp red curry paste
    1 cup low-fat coconut milk
    1 cup chicken broth
    1/2 lb. snow peas, halved
    3 tbsp low-sodium soy sauce
    1 tsp ground cumin
    1 tsp ground coriander
    1 tbsp cornstarch
    10 basil leaves, cut into strips
    4 cups cooked Jasmine rice

    In a large wok, heat the oil over medium-high heat. Add the beef and stir-fry until browned, 4-6 minutes. Remove from the pan and set aside, keeping warm.
    In the same wok, add the bell pepper and mushrooms and stir-fry over medium heat for 5 minutes. Add the ginger and garlic and stir-fry for 2 minutes. Add the beef and curry paste and stir-fry for 2 minutes more. Stir in the coconut milk, broth, snow peas, soy sauce, cumin, and coriander and bring to a gentle simmer over medium heat. Cook, stirring, for about 5 minutes.
    Meanwhile, in a small mixing bowl, combine the cornstarch with 1 tbsp water. Whisk into the curry sauce and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Stir in the basil leaves and serve over rice.

    4 Servings

    Print This Recipe

    posted in Great Bowls of Fire, Main Dishes, Thai | 1 Comment

    20th May 2008

    Pork Tenderloin a la Mexicana

    Puerco Delicioso

    This easy, delicious recipe comes from Mexican Everyday by Rick Bayless. Pork tenderloin is cooked in a sauce of roasted poblano peppers, tomatoes, onions, and garlic. The entire house smelled amazing with it on the stove.

    Lisa says:

    YUM! It smells so good in here.

    Chris says:

    Just wait until you eat it!

    Lisa says:

    This sauce rules — I heart those roasted poblanos.

    Chris says:

    …and the pork is cooked just the way I like it… with just a bit-o-pink in the middle.

    Lisa says:

    Yeah that tenderloin is so… tender!

    Chris says:

    In the spirit of “you are what you eat”, I freely admit to being a pig!

    Pork Tenderloin a la Mexicana

    2 large fresh poblanos
    1 1/4 lb. pork tenderloin, cut into 1-inch cubes
    Salt
    2 tbsp olive oil
    1 medium white onion, sliced 1/4 inch thick
    3 garlic cloves, crushed
    28-oz can fire-roasted diced tomatoes, drained
    3/4 cup beef broth
    1/2 cup coarsely chopped cilantro

    Roast the poblanos either over an open flame or under a broiler, turning regularly until the skin is blistered and blackened all over. Place the peppers in a bowl and cover with plastic wrap to cool.
    While the peppers are cooling, pat the meat dry and salt well. Heat the oil in a large, heavy skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add the pork in a single layer and brown on all sides, turning regularly, for about 4 minutes. Remove from the pan with a slotted spoon, keeping as much of the oil in the pan as possible. Set the skillet aside.
    Remove the skin from the peppers, then remove the stems and seeds. Rinse, then cut into 1/4-inch strips and set aside.
    Return the skillet to medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook for 4-5 minutes, until crisp-tender. Add the garlic and peppers and stir for a minute or so. Pour in the stock and tomatoes, bring to a boil, and let cook until thickened, about 5 minutes. Add the pork and cilantro to the pan, reduce the heat to medium, and simmer until the pork is just cooked through, about 5 more minutes.
    Taste, adjust seasonings, and serve with white rice.

    4 Servings

    Print This Recipe

    posted in Main Dishes, Mexican, Mexican Everyday | 0 Comments

    10th May 2008

    Yum Gai – Thai Chicken Salad

    Yum, Guy!

    This recipe comes from Thai Cooking Made Easy — with this recipe, it lived up to its name. Cooked chicken is shredded and tossed with a bunch of veggies and a slightly spicy lime and fish sauce dressing. This would make a good starter to a larger meal.

    Chris says:

    Yum, guy! I like this salad.

    Lisa says:

    I thought the dressing was going to taste way too fishy when I mixed it up…

    Chris says:

    It’s totally fine — once you toss it in and mix everything together it’s not nearly as intense.

    Lisa says:

    This salad makes me hungry.

    Chris says:

    Not surprising… ain’t no carbs here!

    Lisa says:

    Promise me we’ll never do a low-carb diet.

    Chris says:

    How about we just don’t do any kind of diet?

    Yum Gai – Thai Chicken Salad

    • 2 cups water
    • 1/4 tsp salt
    • 3 skinless, boneless chicken breasts (about 1 lb.)
    • 1 medium tomato, cut into wedges
    • 1 medium red onion, sliced
    • 1 small cucumber, thinly sliced
    • 2 green onions, cut into lengths
    • minced cilantro
    • 4 large lettuce leaves

    For the Dressing:

    • 1 tbsp sliced red chili
    • 3 tbsp freshly squeezed lime juice
    • 3 tbsp fish sauce
    • 1 tsp sugar

    Bring the water and salt to a boil in a saucepan over medium heat and poach the chicken for about 15 minutes or until cooked. Remove and set aside to cool. Shred the chicken into thin strips.
    Combine the Dressing ingredients in a bowl and mix well.
    In a large bowl, combine the chicken strips with the tomato, onion, cucumber, green onions, and cilantro. Pour the dressing over and toss thoroughly.
    Line a serving platter with the lettuce leaves and top with the salad. Serve immediately.

    Serves 4 as a starter or part of a larger meal.

    Print This Recipe

    posted in Salads and Light Soups, Thai, Thai Cooking Made Easy | 4 Comments

    7th May 2008

    New site design!

    As you can see, WHF has a new look — hopefully for the better.  ;)

    I was able to migrate all of the existing posts and photos from Blogger over to WP, and I’m juuuuust about done with customizing templates/themes/etc., but no guarantees that you won’t encounter a few more changes.  For those of you out there who are also thinking of migrating from Blogger to WordPress, I’ll write up the process that I went through.

    Let me know if you encounter major issues and I’ll try to address them as soon as I can.

    In the mean time, eat up!

    Print This Recipe

    posted in Site | 4 Comments


    Page optimized by WP Minify WordPress Plugin