27th November 2012

    North Carolina Pulled Pork Sandwiches

    We’re really starting to get into this slow cooker thing. How great is it to come home to food that’s ready to eat? Though, oops — this recipe does have the extra step of making a sauce using the reduced cooking liquid, so it’s not as one-and-done as others. The following is adapted from Slow Cooker Revolution, has the perfect blend of vinegar, smoke, sweet, and moist pork. We served the pork on a Macrina brioche bun. Dee. Lish.


    Chris says:

    Wow, this is great! I can’t believe I’ve never made this at home. This is way better than some of the pulled pork sandwiches I’ve had at restaurants.

    Lisa says:

    You know what I think of it; I was sneaking bites before you even finished the sauce.

    Chris says:

    Patience, my dear.

    Lisa says:

    Patience is for suckas. I was hungry.

    Chris says:

    You have to admit, though, it was worth waiting for the finished product… the cider vinegar, the sweet from the brown sugar, and you really get that nice smokey flavor from the ham hock, and, well, the liquid smoke.

    Lisa says:

    Obviously it was worth it! I’m just saying. That pork would have disappeared whether or not it was finished.

    North Carolina Pulled Pork Sandwiches
    3 tbsp brown sugar, divided
    2 tbsp paprika
    1 tbsp chili powder
    1/2 tbsp ground cumin
    salt and pepper
    1 2.5-lb boneless pork butt, trimmed and halved
    1 large smoked ham hock, rinsed
    1 cup chicken broth
    1/2 cup cider vinegar
    3/8 cup (6 tbsp) ketchup
    3/4 tsp liquid smoke

    Combine 1.5 tablespoons brown sugar, paprika, chili powder, cumin, 1 teaspoons salt, and 1/2 tablespoon pepper in bowl. Using a fork, prick the pork all over. Rub the brown sugar mixture over the pork, wrap tightly in plastic wrap, and refrigerate for 8 to 24 hours.
    Place ham hock in slow cooker. Unwrap the pork and place on top of the ham hock. Pour broth over pork, cover, and cook until pork is tender, 9 to 11 hours on low or 5 to 7 hours on high.
    Transfer pork and ham hock to a large bowl, let cool slightly, then shred into bite-size pieces discarding skin, bones, and excess fat; cover to keep warm. Let braising liquid settle for 5 minutes, then remove fat from surface using large spoon.
    Strain liquid into medium saucepan and simmer until thickened and measures 1/2 cup, 20 to 30 minutes. Whisk in vinegar, ketchup, liquid smoke, and remaining 1.5 tablespoons sugar and bring to simmer. Season with salt and pepper to taste.
    Toss shredded pork with 3/4 cups sauce; add more sauce as needed to keep meat moist.
    Serve on buns with pickle chips and extra sauce.

    4 generous servings

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    posted in Main Dishes, Slow Cooker Revolution | 5 Comments

    7th August 2011

    Steamed Banana Leaf Salmon

    This is seriously one of the easiest and tastiest salmon recipes we’ve ever made.  Adapted for two from the excellent Good Fish: Sustainable Seafood Recipes from the Pacific Coast by Becky Selengut (from whom I received a private cooking lesson, jealous much?), salmon fillets marinate in sake and mirin before being steamed along with mushrooms and onions.  The marinade is reduced to make an addictive, aromatic sauce.  We served the salmon with some roasted fingerling potatoes. Highly recommended!


    Lisa says:

    I wonder if people think we just don’t cook anymore?

    Chris says:

    I barely do…

    Lisa says:

    Yeah, well I do all the time… I guess we just need to keep adding new recipes to the mix, like this one…

    Chris says:

    Totally! I’m so glad I picked up this book — all the recipes look fantastic.

    Lisa says:

    This salmon is awesome. I love the sauce on top. And hooray for mushrooms!

    Chris says:

    I love recipes that look fancy but are super-simple like this. I guess the hardest thing was finding the banana leaves — which smelled really good while this was steaming, by the way.

    Lisa says:

    Yeah and that wasn’t even that hard — hooray for HT Market!  By the way, it was total torture that the house smelled so good while I was stuck upstairs putting Cason to bed.

    Chris says:

    I do what I can…

    Steamed Banana Leaf Salmon
    1/4 cup sake
    1/4 cup mirin
    2 tbsp soy sauce
    1/2 tsp grated fresh ginger
    1/2 tsp lime juice
    salt
    2 6-oz. sockeye salmon fillets, from the belly
    banana leaves, cut into two 8.5 x 11″ pieces
    1 oz shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, tops sliced thin (heaping 1/4 cup)
    1/4 cup thinly sliced onion
    2 tsps unsalted butter

    In shallow glass dish, combine the sake, mirin, soy sauce, ginger, lime juice, and salt. Add the salmon and marinate for about 30 minutes.

    Lay the banana leaves out and place half the mushrooms and onions on each. Top with a piece of salmon, reserving the marinade. Top each salmon piece with a tsp of butter. Fold the sides of the leaves over the fish and then tuck under the top and bottom to make a packet. Place the two packets into a steamer basket. In a medium saucepan over high heat, add 2 cups water; when it boils, reduce the heat to a simmer, place the steamer basket into the pan and cover. Cook for about 8 minutes per inch of thickness.

    Meanwhile, add the marinade to a small saucepan over high heat and reduce until it gets syrupy, about 10-15 minutes. Remove the salmon packets from the steamer basket and let them rest for a few minutes. Check for the level of doneness you like. Open each packet and top with some of the sauce.

    2 Servings

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    posted in Good Fish, Main Dishes | 1 Comment

    15th May 2011

    Salmon and Asparagus Chowder

    This chowder recipe is from Sunday Soup: A Year’s Worth of Mouth-Watering, Easy-to-Make Recipes, a book Lisa’s mom got for us on a recent visit. We’ve already made two or three recipes, and all have been delicious. Salmon, potatoes, asparagus, what’s not to like?


    Chris says:

    Yum! I love asparagus season. And in a salmon chowder? Sweet!

    Lisa says:

    So good! And it’s similar to the one my brother made in that it’s mostly broth, with just a bit of half-and-half. Not super creamy.

    Chris says:

    Well, it’s awesome — man, I love coming home to food!

    Lisa says:

    It’s kinda funny how much more often I’m cooking now that we have a kid.

    Chris says:

    A lot of things are “funny” now that we have a kid. Like how early we eat, how fast we have to scarf everything down, how tired we are, how…

    Lisa says:

    …how awesome he is?

    Chris says:

    Exactly. Worth it!

    Salmon and Asparagus Chowder
    1 1/2 tbsp unsalted butter
    1 lb yukon gold potatos, unpeeled, washed, cut into 1/2 inch cubes
    1/4 cup finely chopped sweet onion
    3 cloves garlic, minced
    3 cups chicken stock
    1 bunch green onions, cut into 1/4 inch slices
    4 oz asparagus, tips removed and reserved, stalks cut into 1 inch pieces
    1/2 cup half-and-half
    8 oz salmon, skinless, cut into 3/4 inch cubes
    kosher salt
    fresh ground black pepper
    2 tsp chopped dill

    Heat the butter in a large dutch oven over medium heat. When hot, add in the potatoes; cook, stirring often, for 5 minutes. Add the onion and cook, stirring continuously, for 2 minutes. Add the garlic, decrease the heat for low, cover, and cook for another 2 minutes.
    Use a fork or the back of a wooden spoon to mash the potatoes. Add the chicken stock and kick the heat back up to medium, stirring well.
    Bring to a simmer and add the green onions and asparagus, keeping the tips aside. Cover, reduce the heat, and simmer until the asparagus is tender, about 3 minutes.
    Stir in the half-and-half, reserved asparagus tips, and salmon. Turn off the heat and cover.
    Let sit for 4 minute or so until the salmon is cooked through. Season with salt and pepper.
    Serve and top with chopped dill.

    4 Servings

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    posted in Main Dishes, Soups and Stews, Sunday Soup | 1 Comment

    10th April 2011

    We’re back… with another Posole recipe!

    We’ve discovered that having a newborn really cramps your keeping-up-with-a-food-blog style (shocking, no?) — but we’re back with our first recipe in 2011, a delicious Green Chicken Posole, from the book Sunday Soup: A Year’s Worth of Mouth-Watering, Easy-to-Make Recipes. This posole is of the green variety, and the broth is chock-full of tomatillos, cilantro, and oregano. Yum!


    Lisa says:

    Whoa, are we really back? I thought WHF might go the way of our hiking site

    Chris says:

    Hey, don’t say that! Besides, we’ll be doing hikes again this summer. And it’s not like we haven’t been eating, or trying new recipes…

    Lisa says:

    I know, I know… time..

    Cason says:

    Glar-lar-lar… burble..

    Chris says:

    Uh-oh, let’s get through this quick.

    Lisa says:

    Oooh, yeah — okay, well, you know I love posole, and this one might be one of my new favorites.

    Chris says:

    Yeah, mine too! I love the tomatillo-broth base.

    Lisa says:

    It’s a bit spicy, but not overwhelming. Just right.

    Chris says:

    I tamed it a bit by not including most of the seeds from the jalapeño. It –

    Cason says:

    *Spit-up*

    Lisa says:

    Uhhh, can you grab a towel? And can we be done?

    Chris says:

    Yeah, we’re done — hey, people, it’s easy and delicious!

    Mama Veli’s Posole
    4 cups chicken stock
    12 oz boneless chicken breast halves
    12 oz tomatillos
    1 cup chopped onion
    1 cup cilantro
    6 large garlic cloves, peeled
    1 large jalapeño pepper, most of the seeds removed
    1 30 oz can hominy, white or yellow
    1/2 tsp dried oregano
    Salt

    Garnishes:
    Sliced radishes, cubed avocado, shredded cabbage, cilantro, chopped onion, and limes

    Bring the chicken stock to a boil in a large pot with a lid. Add the chicken breasts, cover, and simmer until cooked through, about 14 minutes. When done, remove the chicken, shred with two forks, and place aside. Measure out three cups of the cooking liquid and set aside.
    Remove the husks from the tomatillos, then rinse and chop. Add to a bowl along with the onion, cilantro, garlic, and jalapeño. In a food processor, add half this mixture, along with 1/2 cup of water, and puree until chunky. Do the same with the remaining half.
    Pour the tomatillo mixture into a dutch oven. Add the 3 cups of reserved cooking liquid, the shredded chicken, hominy, and oregano. Bring it to a simmer and cook until just heated through. Season with salt.
    Ladle into bowls and serve with garnishes!

    6 Servings

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    posted in Main Dishes, Mexican, Soups and Stews, Sunday Soup | 1 Comment

    14th November 2010

    Oven-Roasted Coho Salmon with Leeks and Chanterelle Mushrooms

    Wow!  A few days ago Lisa pointed out that we haven’t updated the food blog in over two months — now, lest you think we’ve been dying of hunger, don’t despair.  We’ve just been rotating through a few old favorites while we’ve been preparing for our new arrival (We [Heart] Baby Food, anyone?)… so we’re still here!  I adapted this recipe from one found in The Fishes & Dishes Cookbook: Seafood Recipes and Salty Stories from Alaska’s Commercial Fisherwomen — I got to meet one of the authors when we picked this up at our local Whole Foods.  The book is filled with easy recipes that highlight fresh seafood — so far, every one we’ve tried has been delicious.  Here, coho is pan-seared, then finished in the oven, and placed atop a bed of sauteed leeks and chanterelle mushrooms.  We served it alongside some roasted fingerling potatoes — yum!


    Lisa says:

    I don’t remember what we discussed when we had this, other than it was delicious.

    Chris says:

    …and that you loved the potatoes.

    Lisa says:

    Well, obviously. They were covered with crispy garlic.

    Chris says:

    I did like the how the outside of the salmon was crispy from the pan-sear — and still moist inside. And anytime you add mushrooms to a dish, I’m there.

    Lisa says:

    You and me both, sucka.

    Oven-Roasted Coho Salmon with Leeks and Chanterelle Mushrooms
    1 cup leeks, white and pale green parts only
    2 6-oz skinless coho salmon fillets, deboned
    Sea salt and freshly ground pepper
    1 tbsp butter
    1 clove garlic, minced
    1 cup sliced chanterelle mushrooms
    1/3 cup chicken sotck
    1/3 cup white wine
    1 tsp herbes de provence
    1 tbsp olive oil

    Clean the leeks of all dirt and grit, rinse, and cut into 1/4″ rings. Season the salmon on both sides with salt and pepper.
    Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat, melt the butter, then add the leeks and garlic, cooking for 5 minutes. Add the mushrooms, stock, wine, and herbes de provence, and lower the heat to medium. Simmer until the leeks are very soft and most of the liquid has been absorbed, about 15 minutes. Add salt and pepper to taste, and keep warm over low heat.
    Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 475.
    Heat an ovenproof skillet over medium-high heat for several minutes, then add the oil and heat until it shimmers. Place the salmon fillets in the pan flesh-side down, and cook, without moving, for about 4 minutes. Flip the salmon over, place the pan in the oven, and let bake for 3 minutes.
    Spoon the leek/mushroom mixture onto serving plates, and top each with a salmon fillet.

    2 Servings

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    posted in Fishes & Dishes, Main Dishes | 6 Comments


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