23rd January 2013

    Boo-ya! Bibimbap! (for cheaters)

    bibimbap

     

    I was picking up a few things at the local Trader Joe’s when I saw a package of “Bool Kogi”, apparently TJ’s version of “bulgogi”, and on a whim, threw it in my cart.  Lisa asked how we were going to eat it, and I thought, bibimbap!  We had most of everything we needed on hand (I had also grabbed a bag of baby greens), and this Korean dish is one of my favorites, so it was a no-brainer.  This would obviously be better if you made the bulgogi yourself, but using the TJ shortcut saved a bunch of time (the meat cooks in about 7 minutes) and was certainly good enough to get the job done.

    Bibimbap
    Beef Bulgogi (“Bool Kogi”, in TJ parlance), grilled and sliced thin
    Brown Rice, cooked
    soy sauce
    sesame oil
    canola oil
    sesame seeds
    2 cloves garlic, minced
    1 bunch of spinach, or one bag of baby spinach/kale/chard
    1 carrot, julienned
    1 zucchini, julienned
    5 shiitake mushrooms, sliced thin
    2 eggs
    kimchi
    Gochujang sauce

    Place the spinach/greens in boiling water until wilted, a minute or so. Drain, rinse with cold water, and squeeze dry in paper towels. Add a teaspoon of soy sauce, a pinch of salt, the garlic, and stir. Drizzle with sesame oil and a few sesame seeds; set aside.
    Saute the carrot in a pan over high heat for just 30 seconds or so, set aside.
    Sprinkle salt on the zucchini, then saute the zucchini in a pan over high heat until translucent and set aside.
    Saute the mushrooms over medium high heat with 1 teaspoon of canola oil. Add two teaspoons of soy sauce, a teaspoon of sugar, and stir for a couple of minutes until glazed. Drizzle with sesame oil and set aside.
    Prepare two eggs, sunny-side up. (Here’s one method).

    Assemble!
    In each bowl, put a base layer of rice.
    Arrange each of the toppings (meat, vegetables) separately to your liking, with the fried egg in the center.
    To serve, stir it all up, get that yolk in there, and dig in!

    Serve with gochujang and sesame oil.

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    posted in Korean, Main Dishes | 0 Comments

    10th November 2012

    Toasted Coconut and Kale Salad with Baked Tofu

    Here’s a healthy and toddler-friendly meal (little tofu cubes for little hands!) inspired by a recipe in Heidi Swanson’s Super Natural Every Day. Baked, marinated tofu, along with crispy kale and toasted coconut sit atop a bed of warm farro. If you liked the kale chips recipe you’ll probably be all over this. I really didn’t measure the marinade ingredients, so taste as you go until you get to a flavor balance you like.


    Chris says:

    Well, the kiddo likes it…

    Lisa says:

    Yeah, he’s inhaling! It’s about time you started posting again, by the way. How many times have we made this?

    Chris says:

    First time!

    Lisa says:

    Okay, *I’ve* made this at least three times before, Buster Brown.

    Chris says:

    But never with the tofu.

    Lisa says:

    Sigh… really? Okay, yeah, never with the tofu. Which was my idea anyway.

    Chris says:

    I’m not taking credit for it — even though I want to… yumma.

    Lisa says:

    I’m taking credit for getting seconds.

    Toasted Coconut and Kale Salad with Baked Tofu
    1 16-oz package extra-firm tofu
    1/4 cup soy sauce/liquid aminos
    1/8 cup rice wine vinegar
    1 tbsp sesame oil
    1 tsp lime juice
    1 tsp sugar
    1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
    1 bunch kale, stems and stalks removed, chopped
    1 cup unsweetened large-flake coconut
    2 cups cooked farro

    Preheat the oven to 400°F.
    To prepare the tofu marinade, in a small bowl mix the soy sauce (or liquid aminos), rice wine vinegar, sesame oil, lime juice, and sugar; whisk until incorporated. Cut the tofu into bite-sized cubes, place in a shallow baking dish, and cover with the marinade, ideally for an hour or longer.
    When ready, line a shallow baking pan with parchment paper and, using a slotted spoon, transfer the tofu to the pan. Reserve the marinade.
    Bake the tofu for 30-40 minutes or until desired firmness, flipping the tofu once to brown evenly.
    While the tofu is baking, to prepare the kale and coconut, whisk the olive oil with 3 tbsp of the reserved marinade in a small bowl. Put the kale and coconut in a large bowl and toss well with about two-thirds of the olive oil mixture.
    Spread the kale evenly across two baking sheets. Bake in the oven for the last 12 or so minutes with the tofu, until the coconut is deeply golden brown, tossing once or twice along the way. If the kale mixture on the top baking sheet begins to get too browned, move it to the lower rack.
    Remove from the oven and transfer the kale mixture to a medium bowl to taste. If it needs a bit more dressing, add some and toss. Place the farro on a serving platter and top with the tossed kale and tofu. Serve warm.

    3-4 Servings

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    posted in Main Dishes, Vegetarian | 0 Comments

    9th August 2011

    Cochinita Pibil: Slow-roasted Yucatan Pork

    We had banana leaves left over from the Steamed Salmon recipe, and I happened to stumble across this tasty-looking pork dish a couple of days before a PEPS potluck, so it was a no-brainer to make it our contribution.  I’m still partial to the Carnitas that we’ve made a few times previously, but this recipe is easier, and actually tasted better the next day as leftovers.


    Chris says:

    I love finds like this, that come out of trying to use up something we bought for a different recipe — banana leaves!

    Lisa says:

    I love recipes that list 20 cloves of garlic in the ingredients list.

    Chris says:

    That too — between the garlic, citrus, and achiote paste, the pork has a pretty distinctive flavor. I really like it, it’s different.

    Lisa says:

    You’re right, it’s different and it’s delicious — so what’s the deal with the ‘real’ recipe?

    Chris says:

    Oh, so traditionally you’re supposed to roast a whole suckling pig in a hole in the ground.

    Lisa says:

    (…)

    Chris says:

    Yeah, I thought you’d be fine with pork shoulder.

    Cochinita Pibil
    1 3.5-oz package of El Yucateco Achiote Red Paste
    20 cloves of garlic, peeled and chopped
    1 cup of freshly-squeezed lime juice
    1/2 cup of freshly-squeezed orange juice
    5-6 lbs boneless pork butt
    1 package of banana leaves, defrosted

    Combine the achiote paste, garlic, lime juice, and lemon juice in a blender, and puree until smooth. Cut pork into large square portions, leaving much of the fat (you can always remove any fatty pieces after it’s cooked) cover with the paste mixture, and marinate in refrigerator overnight, 12-24 hours.
    Preheat oven to 300 degrees.
    Line a roasting pan with overlapping banana leaves, letting them hang over the sides. Put the pork and marinade inside, wrap the leaves over the top, then top more overlapping leaves on top to create a sealed package. You should also then line the roasting pan with foil to prevent steam from escaping.
    Cook 3.5-4 hours, until pork shreds easily with a fork.
    Serve in tacos with pickled onions (recipe here), guacamole, and a *very* spicy hot sauce.

    8 Servings

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    posted in Main Dishes, Mexican | 0 Comments

    30th May 2011

    Thanksgiving in May: Sweet Potato-Pecan Casserole

    This last side-dish from our Thanksgiving in May roundup comes from Ellie Krieger, who often features lower-fat versions of classic recipes.  Since we had about two gallons of butter in our stuffing, it was nice to pretend that we were having a light meal with the addition of this Sweet Potato and Pecan Casserole.  The pecan topping was delicious and crunch-tastic.


    Chris says:

    Well, it’s over, this Thanksgiving of ours… 

    Lisa says:

    Noooo, it can’t be! 

    Chris says:

    Don’t worry, it’ll live on in leftovers and blog posts. 

    Lisa says:

    Blog posts? Yeah, right… with the kid coming, we won’t have time for that. 

    Chris says:

    Don’t you see? It’s perfect! We probably won’t get to posting it until late spring, or even summer! Then we’ll be able to look back upon these dishes and salivate all over again! 

    Lisa says:

    Oh, so like instead of “Christmas in July”, we’ll have “Thanksgiving in May”? 

    Chris says:

    Exactly

    Sweet Potato-Pecan Casserole
    3 1/2 lbs sweet potatoes (about 5 medium), peeled and cut into 1-inch chunks
    1/3 cup honey
    1 large egg
    1 tsp ground cinnamon
    1/4 tsp ground nutmeg
    1/8 tsp ground ginger
    salt
    1 tbsp packed dark brown sugar
    1/3 cup finely chopped pecans

    Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Mist an 8-inch square baking dish with cooking spray.

    Bring a few inches of water to a boil in a pot with a large steamer basket in place. Put the sweet potatoes in the basket, cover and steam until tender, 20 to 25 minutes. Transfer the potatoes to a bowl and let cool slightly. Add the honey, egg, 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, the nutmeg, ginger and 1/2 teaspoon salt; whip with an electric mixer until smooth. Spread the sweet potato mixture in the prepared baking dish.

    Mix the brown sugar, pecans and the remaining 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon in a bowl; sprinkle over the potatoes. Bake until hot and beginning to brown around the edges, 40 to 45 minutes.

    Eat.

    8 Servings

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    posted in Sides, Vegetarian | 0 Comments

    21st May 2011

    Thanksgiving in May: Challah, Herb and Mushroom Stuffing

    Welcome back to Thanksgiving in May! This is the most buttery, herby, shroomy, deeeelish stuffing we’ve enjoyed in a long time. I went searching for a new stuffing recipe and when I stumbled upon this one at food52 I knew I found our winner. The most difficult part of this recipe was tracking down a loaf of challah in the days leading up to the holiday.


    Lisa says:

    Oh my god, I forgot about this one. 

    Chris says:

    Not me — I loved how buttery it was, and the texture was awesome — almost like a bread pudding. 

    Lisa says:

    Yeah! Crisped on top and soft inside, SO GOOD. 

    Chris says:

    Holla back, challah bread! 

    Lisa says:

    Unnecessary. 

    Chris says:

    Oh I don’t think so. 

    Challah, Herb and Mushroom Stuffing
    1 large loaf of challah
    2 cups celery, diced
    2 cups onion, diced
    2 cups cremini mushroom, diced
    8-10 sprigs thyme, chopped
    1/4 c chopped flat leaf parsley
    3 cups vegetable stock
    4 oz melted butter, plus more for buttering the baking dish and parchment
    1 tsp salt
    1 tsp black pepper, freshly ground

    Cut the challah into 1″ cubes. Leave the cubes out on a parchment lined sheet pan, on the counter, to get stale, at least overnight and preferably 3 days.

    Melt 3 oz of butter in a large heavy pan. Saute the onions until wilted, add the herbs, celery and mushrooms and cook until just slightly cooked thorough.

    In a large bowl, combine bread cubes, vegetables, melted butter and vegetable stock, and salt and pepper. Test for seasoning and adjust.

    Press stuffing into a large buttered baking dish. Cover with buttered parchment and then foil. At this point, the stuffing can be held for several hours, but should be at room temperature before baking.

    Bake at 350° for 45-55 minutes, the last 10-15 minutes without the foil and parchment, to crisp the surface.

    Devour and collapse into a butter-coma.

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    posted in Sides, Vegetarian | 3 Comments


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