1st September 2011

    Tilapia with Fresh Corn and Hatch Chiles

    It’s that time of year that some wait on pins-and-needles for… hatch chile season! ┬áThe roasters are out in full force at several grocery stores in the area, and with a freezer full of chiles, I wanted to find a recipe off the beaten “green chile stew”/”green chile enchiladas” path. ┬áThis recipe is adapted from Real Women Eat Chiles and has quite the eye-appealing presentation. Tilapia, catfish, or any other firm-fleshed whitefish is baked in a corn husk with freshly-cut corn, hatch chiles, green onions, and lime. Simple and delicious.


    Chris says:

    I promise not to make any corny puns in this recipe review. 

    Lisa says:

    I’m pretty sure that counts as one, so too late. 

    Chris says:

    Ah, crap. Oh well — so I was describing this dish to someone and he said it almost “sounds like a tamale”, which is exactly what it’s called in the book. 

    Lisa says:

    “Sounds like a tamale” is a strange name for this recipe.. 

    Chris says:

    Okay, *now* who’s being silly? Yeah, you. No, it’s called “Tamale-style catfish”. 

    Lisa says:

    Ah, because of the wrapping with the husk and steaming and such. 

    Chris says:

    Yes! Anyway, I think the presentation of this dish is pretty cool. 

    Lisa says:

    Agreed — but don’t let that detract from the delicousness. I love the corn and hatch chile combo on top, and the fish is perfectly cooked. 

    Chris says:

    More than just a kernel of truth there — no dryness. That corn husk seemed to keep all the moisture in. 

    Lisa says:

    You were just waiting to make a corn pun, weren’t you? 

    Chris says:

    Or a corn pone — yum! 

    Tilapia with Fresh Corn and Hatch Chiles
    2 ears of fresh corn
    1/4 cup hatch chiles (more or less, depending on your desired heat level)
    1/4 cup green onions
    1/2 lime
    2 tilapia fillets
    ancho chile powder, to garnish

    Preheat the oven to 400 F.

    Carefully peel back the husk from each corn cob. You will use it for baking the fish.
    Cut the ear of corn off the stem just above the end of the cob, leaving the husk intact. Set the husk aside. Cut the corn off the cob and combine with green chiles, green onions and the juice of a quarter of a lime.

    Rinse the fish and pat dry. Place one fillet inside each of the corn husks. Top each with one-half of the corn mixture and close the husks over the fish, overlapping slightly.

    Bake for 15 minutes, or until the fish flakes easily. Cut the remaining lime lengthwise into 2 wedges. Serve the fish in the husk with a lime wedge on top.

    2 Servings

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    posted in Main Dishes | 3 Comments

    31st August 2010

    Summer Corn and Dungeness Crab Bisque


    This recipe was a nice little find that popped up when I was searching for something that included a bunch of items in this week’s CSA box. I modified it a bit to make it a bit lighter and to use what we had on hand — it is super-simple and easily adaptable. This soup/bisque has a really nice sweet flavor from the corn, and is a great base for a nice pile of delicious Dungeness crab — though you’ll probably want to wait for it to go on sale. That stuff is expensive!


    Chris says:

    I’ve got just one question for you.

    Lisa says:

    What’s that?

    Chris says:

    Do you like crab?

    Lisa says:

    I love crab, why?

    Chris says:

    Do you like sweet corn?

    Lisa says:

    You know I do… that’s two questions, by the way.

    Chris says:

    Doh — whatever. I just think you’re going to love this — have a spoonful.

    Lisa says:

    Whoa, that’s awesome! The flavor of the corn in the soup is great, and then getting to crunch on those kernels… delicious!

    Chris says:

    Yeah — all that, and — piled with crab!

    Lisa says:

    I heart crab! Hey — I’ve got just one question for you.

    Chris says:

    What’s that?

    Lisa says:

    Do we have to share this?


    Summer Corn and Dungeness Crab Bisque
    4 cloves garlic, peeled
    3 tbsp butter
    18-20 baby carrots
    1 large yellow onion
    3-4 Swiss chard stems
    2 stalks celery
    2 medium zucchini
    2 tbsp Herbes de Provence
    3 cups chicken broth (or vegetable, or a little of each)
    2 ears of sweet corn, husked
    1 cup fat-free Half and Half
    1 pound of Dungeness Crab meat, diced

    Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
    Place the garlic in an aluminum foil pocket, drizzle with olive oil, and seal.
    Roast for 30 minutes.
    Meanwhile, in a dutch oven, melt the butter over medium heat.
    Start dicing the vegetables and add them to the pot, starting with the carrots and working your way through to the zucchini.
    Saute for about five minutes, and add in the herbs. Once vegetables have softened, add in the broth, reduce to a simmer, cover, and cook for about 30 minutes.
    While the vegetables are simmering, bring a large pot of water to boil and boil the corn for about three minutes.
    Remove and let cool a bit, slice the kernels from the cob, and set aside.
    “Milk” the cob (run the back of your knife down the length of the cob after the kernels are removed to collect the delicious milky corn squeezin’s) and add this to the pot.
    Once the garlic is roasted and the vegetables have been simmering for 30 minutes, add the garlic and Half-and-Half.
    Use a stick-blender to puree the vegetables and stock into a smooth consistency — you’ll get texture in a bit.
    Add the reserved corn and half of the crab meat to the pot, mix well, and simmer for another five minutes.
    Season with salt and pepper to taste.
    Divide among bowls, and garnish with remaining crab meat.

    4-6 generous servings

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    posted in Soups and Stews | 2 Comments

    20th August 2009

    Grilled Mahi Mahi with Pan-Roasted Corn Salsa and Black Beans

    mahiblackbeancorn

    This recipe from Mccormick & Schmick’s Seafood Restaurant Cookbook was deeeelicious and a great summer meal. We needed the grill on for the fish anyway, so we grilled the corn on the cob for the pan salsa. The recipe as written in the book uses a lot more butter and store-bought salsa, but we had just received tomatillos in our CSA box so I decided to make a roasted tomatillo salsa and use that instead.


    Lisa says:

    Hey, it’s Black Bean Mountain!

    Chris says:

    Yes, but look what you get to eat at the summit.

    Lisa says:

    Mmmm… if only this was served at the top of *real* mountains…

    Chris says:

    Pretty good, huh? That corn salsa is good, and I’m glad I made that tomatillo salsa to go with.

    Lisa says:

    Yeah I’m a big fan of this one.

    Chris says:

    Can’t really go wrong with grilled fish — well, unless you overcook it…

    Lisa says:

    …which you didn’t, so no worries.

    Chris says:

    I heart summer!

    Grilled Mahi Mahi with Pan-Roasted Corn Salsa and Black Beans
    2 6-oz mahi mahi fillets
    4 oz barbecue sauce
    1 tbsp butter
    1/2 cup finely diced onion
    1/2 cup finely diced red bell pepper
    1/2 cup finely diced green bell pepper
    1 cup corn, fresh off the cob
    2 tsp cumin
    1 tsp salt
    1 tsp pepper
    2 tsp freshly squeezed lime juice
    1/4 cup Roasted Green Tomatillo Salsa
    1 28-oz can black beans, warmed

    Grill the mahi mahi, basting frequently with the barbecue sauce. Meanwhile, saute the onions, peppers, and corn in the butter until cooked but still firm. Season with the cumin, salt, pepper, and lime juice. Add the tomatillo salsa. Toss to blend. Place a mound of the black beans in the center of each plate and top with the mahi mahi fillets and corn salsa.

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    posted in Main Dishes, McCormick & Schmick | 1 Comment

    26th December 2008

    Guest Post: Salmon Chowder

    salmonchowder

    A very special guest post this evening from Lisa’s brother Chris (yes, another Chris…) and his girlfriend Jenn — a delicious Salmon Chowder from The Ultimate Soup Bible. C&J made an enormous cauldron of the chowder that fed nine or ten lucky souls over the course of two nights. I only had my point-and-shoot camera with me, so I wasn’t able to get as good a picture of the chowder as I normally would — guess, we’ll just have to make it ourselves! (As if we really needed an excuse…) We served the chowder with a few sides and salads we’ve made before, including these roasted yams, a salad featuring arugula and roasted bell peppers, and one featuring layered beets and avocados.


    Overheard:

    This is wonderful, who made this?

    I really like that the broth isn’t super-thick like in a lot of chowders.

    Tell Chris this chowder is better than a few others I’ve had recently…

    Oooh, I like the corn in this. Good addition!

    The dill is great — perfect amount.

    Great success!

    Salmon Chowder
    1 1/2 tbsp butter
    1 onion, finely chopped
    1 leek, finely chopped
    1 small fennel bulb, finely chopped
    1/4 cup all-purpose flour
    7 cups chicken stock
    2 medium potatoes, cut into 1/2 inch cubes
    1 lb salmon fillet, skinned and cut into 3/4 inch cubes
    1 can corn, drained
    3/4 cup milk
    1/2 cup whipping cream
    2 tbsp chopped fresh dill
    salt and freshly ground pepper

    Melt the butter in a large pan. Add the onion, leek, and fennel and cook for 6 minutes until softened. Stir in the flour and reduce the heat to low. Cook for 3 minutes, stirring occasionally with a wooden spoon. Add the chicken stock and potatoes to the mixture in the pan. Season with a little salt and black pepper. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat , cover, and simmer for 20 minutes or until the potatoes are tender. Add the salmon and simmer gently 3-5 minutes until just cooked. Stir in the corn, milk, cream, and chopped dill into the pan. Cook until just warmed through, stirring occasionally. Do not boil. To thicken, smash some of the potatoes against the side of the pot. Adjust the seasoning to taste, then ladle into warm bowls.

    4 (large) Servings

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    posted in Main Dishes, The Soup Bible | 2 Comments

    21st December 2008

    Quinoa with Corn, Kale, Roasted Cherry Tomatoes… and more…

    quinoacornkale

    Lisa spotted this everything-but-the-kitchen-sink quinoa recipe over at 101 Cookbooks, where it’s titled “Heather’s Quinoa”. We’re glad that Heidi decided to post this mish-mash, we both really enjoyed all the different tastes and textures. We had a small block of Gruyere left in the fridge, so we also invited that little guy to the party.

    Chris says:

    Holy; what *isn’t* in this quinoa?

    Lisa says:

    Not much, isn’t it awesome?

    Chris says:

    Yeah — I like all the surprises. Also, it’s surprisingly filling.

    Lisa says:

    I’m sure the biscotti we’ve been eating all afternoon contributed to that.

    Chris says:

    Well yeah, somewhat…

    Lisa says:

    Wow — I just realized that even Abbie could eat this — there are no “gross vegetables”

    Chris says:

    Oh please; you would have had her at pesto

    Lisa says:

    Well, we’ll have to make it at least one more time then!

    Quinoa with Corn, Kale, Roasted Cherry Tomatoes… and more…
    extra-virgin olive oil
    sea salt
    brown sugar, spoonful
    1 shallot, minced
    2 cups quinoa
    1 cup corn, fresh or frozen
    1 bunch kale, finely chopped
    2 cups firm nigari tofu, browned
    1/3 cup pesto
    1/3 cup pepitas
    1/2 cup cherry tomatoes
    1/4 cup shredded Gruyere cheese

    Roast the cherry tomatoes: Heat oven to 350F degrees. Cut each tomato in half and arrange in a large oven-proof baking dish. Add a splash of olive oil, a spoonful of brown sugar, and some few pinches of salt, and pour over the tomatoes. Toss to coat the tomatoes, and flip them so they’re cut-side up. Place in the oven and bake for 45 minutes, until the tomatoes look shrunken and delicious.
    While the tomatoes bake, rinse the quinoa in a fine-meshed strainer. In a medium saucepan heat the quinoa and 4 cups water until boiling. Reduce heat and simmer until water is absorbed and quinoa fluffs up, about 15 minutes. Quinoa is done when completely tender. Drain any extra water and set aside.
    In a dutch oven heat the olive oil and salt over medium-high heat. Stir in the shallot and cook for a minute or two. Add the quinoa and corn and cook until sizzling. Stir in the kale and the tofu, cooking until tofu is heated through. Remove from the heat and stir in the pesto and pumpkin seeds. Stir until the pesto is well incorporated. Transfer onto a platter and top with the shredded Gruyere and cherry tomatoes.

    Serves 4 – 6

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    posted in Main Dishes | 5 Comments


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