5th August 2009

    Baba Ghanoush

    baba
    This particular recipe for baba ghanoush (or baba ghannouj, moutabal, etc.) comes from a book called Little Foods of the Mediterranean: 500 Fabulous Recipes for Antipasti, Tapas, Hors d’Oeuvres, Meze, and More, but honestly, the basic recipe is pretty simple: eggplant, tahini, lemon, garlic. We served it with the gyros we made for the Almost Meatless Potluck.


    Chris says:
    Hooray, I’ve always wanted to make baba ghanoush! I love the smokiness from the grilled and blackened eggplant.

    Lisa says:

    Yeah, this is good — tastes really close to how my dad makes it.

    Chris says:

    Same ingredients I’m assuming?

    Lisa says:

    Yep… though we always called it “moutabal” growing up.

    Chris says:

    I think this one came out just a little … sweet? …is that possible? It might just need a pinch more salt.

    Lisa says:

    You’ll never get an argument from me on adding salt. To anything.

    Baba Ghanoush
    2 medium-size eggplants
    4 1/2 tbsp fresh lemon juice
    1/4 cup tahini
    2 large garlic cloves, peeled
    1 tsp salt
    Extra-virgin olive oil
    parsley

    Score the eggplants all over with a fork. Preheat a gas grill on high and grill the eggplant whole until the skins are black and blistered, about 40 minutes. Remove the skins and spoon out the insides as soon as you can handle the eggplant. Puree the pulp in a food processor, then drain the bitter liquid from the eggplant by letting it sit in a strainer over a bowl for an hour.
    In a small bowl, mix the lemon juice and tahini. Pound the garlic and salt together in a mortar until it is a paste, then stir into the tahini. Stir into the eggplant puree. Taste and add water to thin.
    Pour onto a serving platter and drizzle with olive oil, then top with parsley.
    Scoop with pita or Arabic flatbread.

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    posted in Appetizers, Arabic, Armenian, Middle Eastern | 2 Comments

    21st February 2009

    Kashmiri-Style Kidney Beans with Parsnips

    parsnipandkidneybeans

    I found this recipe on AllRecipes while looking for a way to use the parsnips in our CSA box. The original features turnips, but I thought that the substitution would probably work out fine, and it certainly did. This is a really simple, flavorful recipe that seems very adaptable and would be a great way to use up turnips, parsnips, or carrots.


    Lisa says:

    What’s in here with the kidney beans?

    Chris says:

    Parsnips. The original recipes used turnips.

    Lisa says:

    Wait, what’s the difference again? I always forget.

    Chris says:

    Parsnips look like big white carrots, and turnips are those round purple ones.

    Lisa says:

    Oh yeah — well whichever one this is, it’s delicious. It almost tastes like a slighty-sweet potato.

    Chris says:

    I thought so too. I just really like the flavor of the sauce.

    Lisa says:

    And wahoo, another vegetarian meal!

    Chris says:

    Yeah, how’d that happen? Where’s the beef?

    Lisa says:

    I’m campaigning for another Vegetarian Week like we did a while back.

    Chris says:

    Can we count bacon as a vegetable?

    Kashmiri-Style Kidney Beans with Parsnips
    4 parsnips, peeled and cubed
    1 cup water
    1/2 tsp salt
    1 14.5-oz can kidney beans, drained
    2 tbsp vegetable oil
    1/2 tsp whole cumin seeds
    1/2 tsp whole fennel seeds
    1 cup finely chopped red onion
    1/2 tsp minced fresh ginger root
    3 garlic cloves, crushed
    1 cup chopped tomatoes
    1/2 tsp salt
    1 tsp paprika
    1/2 tsp turmeric
    1/2 tsp ground ginger
    2 tbsp water
    1/2 tsp garam masala
    cilantro, to garnish

    Place parsnips into a saucepan with the water and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce heat to medium-low, cover, and simmer until the parsnips are soft, about 5 minutes. Once tender, stir in the kidney beans, and cook 5 minutes more.
    Meanwhile, heat the vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in the cumin and fennel, and cook until the spices toast and become fragrant, about 1 minute. Stir in the onion, and cook until it turns golden brown, about 5 minutes. Stir in the minced ginger and garlic, cook and stir for 30 seconds, then add the tomatoes and salt, and continue cooking until the mixture turns pasty. Finally, stir in the paprika, turmeric, ground ginger, and 2 tablespoons water; cook 2 minutes more.
    Add the tomato mixture to the parsnips, and simmer 10 minutes. Season with garam masala before serving and top with chopped cilantro. Serve over basmati rice or similar.

    3 Servings

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    posted in Indian, Main Dishes, Vegetarian | 4 Comments

    24th October 2008

    Red Chileatole with Mushrooms, Corn, Peppers, and Chicken

    This is a perfect recipe to adapt to the vegetables you happen to have on hand.  Our CSA box came loaded with corn on the cob and mushrooms, so I modified a recipe from Rick Bayless’s Mexican Everyday to use the fresh vegetables of the day.  As the book suggests, one of the great things about this soup is that once you master the base broth, the variations are limited only by your imagination.

    Lisa says:

    Wahoo! I love walking in the door to a meal that’s ready to go!

    Chris says:

    I like not feeling rushed on nights that you’re home late.

    Lisa says:

    Nice. Is it spicy?

    Chris says:

    Shouldn’t be — ancho powder is relatively mild; it has a slightly smokey flavor.

    Lisa says:

    Mmmmm… the masa harina really gives it a nice consistency.

    Chris says:

    Totally — and the flavor goes really well with the fresh corn kernels. The starch from juicing the cobs also helps thicken it.

    Lisa says:

    I like how thin you cut the chicken.

    Chris says:

    Yep — it cooks pretty quickly that way.

    Lisa says:

    Well this soup is disappearing pretty quickly this way.

    Red Chileatole with Mushrooms, Corn, Peppers, and Chicken
    1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
    1 medium white onion, halved and sliced
    4 cloves garlic, peeled
    2 tbsp ancho chile powder
    1 1/2 tbsp masa harina
    4 cups chicken broth, divided
    6 oz cremini mushrooms, stemmed and sliced 1/2 inch thick
    2 ears of corn
    1/2 poblano pepper, cut into 1/4-inch cubes
    1 large sprig fresh flat-leaf parsley
    3/4 lb boneless, skinless chicken breast, cut crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick slices
    salt, to taste

    Husk the corn. In a shallow bowl, hold ears of corn upright and, with a sharp knife, cut kernels from the cobs. Then with blunt edge of the knife, scrape juice from cobs. Discard the cobs.

    Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and garlic and cook, stirring until golden, about 7 minutes. Transfer the onion and garlic to a food processor or blender. Add chile powder, masa harina, and 1 1/2 cups broth; process until smooth.

    Return the puree to the saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring constantly, until slightly thickened, about 2 minutes. Add the remaining 2 1/2 cups broth, mushrooms, corn kernels and juices, poblano pepper, and parsley and return to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 10 minutes. Stir in chicken and continue to simmer until cooked through, 6 to 8 minutes more. Taste and add salt if needed. Remove parsley and ladle into soup bowls.

    3-4 Servings

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    posted in Main Dishes, Mexican, Mexican Everyday | 2 Comments

    15th March 2008

    Mushroom and Tofu Stir Fry


    A few nights ago Lisa raided the CSA box and made this stir fry, based on one she found on Elise’s site. She changed up the vegetables a bit and cut the oil almost in half (Elise loves her oil)! ;)

    Chris says:

    Wow the sauce on this is fantastic.

    Lisa says:

    Yeah, and spicy! I got to use your rooster sauce.

    Chris says:

    Everything’s better with rooster sauce…

    Lisa says:

    The tofu and the rice make this a lot more filling than I thought it would be.

    Chris says:

    I know! I’m kind of full but I’m going to eat more anyway — it’s all veggies so I know I’ll just be hungry later on.

    Lisa says:

    I’m going to save the rest for my lunch.

    Chris says:

    Sorry sucka — “the rest”? “The rest” is already in my belly.

    Mushroom and Tofu Stir Fry
    ————————–
    Glaze
    2 Tbsp soy sauce
    2 Tbsp honey
    1/4 cup of chickenbroth

    Sauce
    3 Tbsp soy sauce
    3/4 cup chicken or vegetable broth
    2 Tbsp honey
    1 Tbsp rice wine
    1 teaspoon Sriracha
    1 Tbsp corn starch

    Vegetables
    4 teaspoons minced garlic
    4 teaspoons minced fresh ginger
    2 Tbsp vegetable oil
    1 lb of cremini or button mushrooms, quartered
    1 cup onion
    4 oz extra-firm tofu
    1 cup broccoli, roughly chopped
    1 cup carrots, in 1/2-inch dice
    1/2 cup chicken broth
    1/2 red bell pepper, diced
    1/2 green bell pepper, diced
    1 1b bok choy stems, in 1/2-inch dice
    1 Tbsp toasted sesame seeds

    Whisk the glaze ingredients together in a bowl and the sauce ingredients together in a different bowl. In a third bowl, mix the garlic, ginger and 1 teaspoon of vegetable oil.
    Heat 1 Tbsp of vegetable oil in a large, stick-free skillet on medium-high heat. Add mushrooms, onion, and tofu, and cook, without stirring, until browned on one side, about 2 to 3 minutes. Reduce heat to medium and use tongs to turn the mushrooms to brown the other side. When mushrooms are browned and tender, about 5 minutes, increase the heat to medium-high and add the glaze. Cook, stirring to coat the mushrooms, 1 to 2 minutes more. Transfer mushrooms to a large bowl. Wipe out skillet with a paper towel.
    Heat a teaspoon of vegetable oil in the skillet on medium-high heat until the pan begins to smoke. Add carrots and broccoli and cook, stirring occasionally, until they begin to brown, 1 to 2 minutes. Add 1/2 cup broth and cover skillet. Cook until carrots are tender, 2 to 3 minutes. Uncover and cook until liquid evaporates. Transfer carrots to bowl with mushrooms. Wipe skillet clean with paper towel.
    Heat a teaspoon of vegetable oil in the skillet on medium high heat until it begins to smoke. Add the bell pepper and bok choy stems and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables begin to brown and soften, about 1 to 2 minutes. Add leafy greens and cook for a minute further. Push the veggies to the side of the pan and add the garlic-ginger mixture in the clearing. Cook 15 seconds, until fragrant, and then mix in with the other vegetables.
    Add all the vegetables back into the pan (mushrooms, carrots, etc.). Add the sauce to the pan. Mix well and cook, stirring, until the sauce has thickened and all the vegetables are coated with the sauce, about 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer to a serving platter. Sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds if desired. Serve immediately with rice.

    4 Servings

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    posted in Main Dishes | 0 Comments

    24th February 2008

    Tomato Soup with Israeli Couscous

    Tonight I finally got around to making a soup from The Ultimate Soup Bible, a cookbook we got from Lisa’s brother at Christmas. This easy to make tomato soup is made with Israeli couscous (which is much larger and chewier than regular couscous), onions, tomatoes, garlic, cilantro, and mint; the soup has a great aroma and wonderfully garlicky flavor. It should appear in the rotation pretty regularly. We loved it.

    Lisa says:

    I love Israeli couscous… and this soup is so colorful.

    Chris says:

    It’s delicious. I like the cayenne: it’s subtle — just a slight tingle in the back of the throat.

    Lisa says:

    Oh *that’s* what that is. I was worried I was coming down with something.

    Chris says:

    Well, you’ll feel the blues if I take your soup away.

    Lisa says:

    Yeah, I will — I definitely want to have this again…

    Chris says:

    You’re in luck, then. The recipe makes so much that we’re having leftovers tomorrow night!

    Lisa says:

    Wahoo!

    Tomato Soup with Israeli Couscous
    ———————————
    2 tbsp olive oil
    1 onion, chopped
    2 medium carrots, chopped
    14 oz can chopped tomatoes
    7 garlic cloves, chopped
    6 cups chicken stock (or vegetable stock, if you’re veg.)
    1 1/3 cups Israeli couscous
    3 mint sprigs, chopped
    5 cilantro sprigs, chopped
    1/4 tsp ground cumin
    cayenne pepper, to taste
    salt and ground pepper, to taste

    Heat the oil over medium heat in a large saucepan. Add the onions and carrots and cook until they are soft, about 10 minutes. Add 1/2 the garlic and the remaining ingredients to the pan. Bring the soup to a boil, add all but 1 tsp of the chopped garlic, then reduce the heat and simmer for 7-10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the couscous is tender. Remove from the heat, stir in the rest of the garlic, and ladle into bowls. Serve with warm sourdough bread.

    4-6 Servings

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    posted in Main Dishes, The Soup Bible | 11 Comments


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