6th April 2010

    Salmon and Baby Bok Choy Ramen

    Here’s a dish we made a few weeks ago from The Ultimate Soup Bible. A salmon fillet is cut on the diagonal into thin slices which are seared and then placed into a bowl of steaming hot, richly-flavored broth and udon noodles. Baby bok choy adds color and some crunch.


    Lisa says:

    Oh my god, it’s a miracle.

    Chris says:

    What?

    Lisa says:

    Okay, two miracles. One, you’re updating the blog. Two, the recipe doesn’t include mushrooms.

    Chris says:

    Since when are mushrooms a problem?

    Lisa says:

    They’re not… it’s just… I’ve gotten comments. I’ve heard things.

    Chris says:

    Uh…

    Lisa says:

    Yeah. People are starting to think that’s all we eat.

    Chris says:

    Well we do like mushrooms.

    Lisa says:

    That’s true… but… I’m just saying. That last post has been up there for a while. I was wondering if we were going to change the blog’s name to WeHeartShrooms.com…

    Chris says:

    Hey if that’s not registered yet, I’m gonna grab it. So…

    Lisa says:

    …yeah?

    Chris says:

    You want to talk about this dish at all?

    Lisa says:

    Oh yeah, right! I loved it! Those really thin slices of salmon were awesome. And I just love a big bowl of soup.

    Chris says:

    Same here — I hadn’t grilled such thin slices like that before. It worked out well. And those thick udon noodles are great for slurping. You know how much I love the slurping.

    Lisa says:

    Yes. Yes I do. And I guess if the biggest complaint about a dish is how loud it is when your dining partner eats it… well that’s really not much to complain about at all.

    Salmon and Baby Bok Choy Ramen
    6 cups vegetable stock
    1 tbsp minced fresh ginger
    2 garlic cloves, crushed
    6 green onions, sliced
    3 tbsp soy sauce
    3 tbsp sake
    1 lb salmon fillet, skinned
    1 tsp peanut oil
    12 oz udon noodles
    4-5 baby bok choy, broken into leaves
    1 fresh red chili pepper, seeded and sliced
    1 cup bean sprouts
    salt and pepper

    Pour the stock into a pot and add the ginger, garlic, and a third of the green onions. Add the soy sauce and sake, and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and simmer for 30 minutes.
    Meanwhile, cut the salmon at a severe angle into 12 slices. Brush a grill pan with the oil and heat until very hot. Sear the salmon slices for 1-2 minutes on each side until tender. Set aside.
    Cook the udon noodles as per the directions, then drain and cool under cold running water. Drain again.
    Strain the broth into a clean pot, season, and bring to a low boil. Add the bok choy.
    Divide the noodles among 4 deep bowls, along with the salmon slices, green onions, chili, and bean sprouts. Ladle in the broth.

    4 Servings.

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    posted in Asian, Main Dishes, Soups and Stews, The Soup Bible | 2 Comments

    5th January 2010

    Orzo Chickpea Soup

    Lisa made this soup when we were in California during the holidays — orzo, chickpeas, and spinach swim in a simple vegetable broth, topped with garlicky tomatoes and shredded Parmesan. Lisa’s dad liked the soup so much he decided to make it again just a few days later. The recipe is based on one from Heidi’s site, with a few additions.


    Chris says:

    A delicious noodle soup, orzo it seems

    Lisa says:

    C’mon, no puns tonight please.

    Chris says:

    Alright, fine. I do love the addition of the chickpeas…

    Seto says:

    This is very good Lisa! I’m having more.

    Lisa says:

    Awesome! I love the egg whites… they add a neat texture to the broth.

    Chris says:

    I bet this would be good with the kale option as well — if we make this when we get back to Seattle let’s do it that way.

    Seto says:

    I’ll be making this myself by the end of the week. Leave me the recipe…

    7 cups vegetable broth
    1 1/2 cups orzo
    2 cups spinach, chopped
    1 14-oz can chickpeas (garbanzo beans)
    1 14-oz can fire-roasted diced tomatoes, well drained
    1 tsp crushed red pepper
    2-3 cloves garlic, minced
    extra virgin olive oil
    3 egg whites
    sea salt

    grated Parmesan cheese

    Bring the broth to a boil in a large saucepan. Add the orzo and cook until just tender – about ten minutes. Stir in the chopped spinach and chickpeas.

    Meanwhile, heat the tomatoes, red pepper, garlic, and a splash of extra virgin olive oil in a separate saucepan. Taste for seasoning and salt if needed.

    Just before serving, slowly pour the egg whites into the soup, stirring quickly with a whisk. Taste and add more salt if needed. Divide the soup among four bowls, each serving topped with a spoonful of tomatoes, a drizzle of olive oil, and some of the cheese.

    4-6 Servings

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    posted in Soups and Stews, Vegetarian | 5 Comments

    14th July 2009

    Pork Posole

    posolerojo

    The Third Place Books close to us was having a blowout on used books a couple of weeks ago, and we picked up a copy of The Best of Cooking Light: Everyday Favorites for four bucks (I’m a sucker for cookbooks with pictures). This pork posole recipe caught my eye because it looked pretty much like a normal (aka, non-light) posole recipe. Pork is browned and then added to a stock made from chicken broth and pureed ancho chilies. This recipe is all about the condiments: a squeeze of lime and a bunch of cilantro really brings out the flavors in this soup.


    Lisa says:

    We must love posole — I think we have four different recipes on the site.

    Chris says:

    Yep, and each one is a little different.

    Lisa says:

    I’m not sure about this one, you know I like the stewier ones.

    Chris says:

    Well, even though this one is broth-based, I think you’ll like it.

    Lisa says:

    Hmmm… kind of bland.

    Chris says:

    What? Ahhh… hit it with those garnishes. Squeeze that lime! Add those onions! Savor the cilantro!

    Lisa says:

    Wow, that makes a big difference… yum! It’s definitely growing on me.

    Chris says:

    Yeah, keep going…

    Lisa says:

    Awesome — I’m going back for more.

    Chris says:

    Mission Accomplished!

    Pork Posole
    4 ancho chilies, stemmed and seeded
    2 cups boiling water
    1 tbsp cumin seeds
    1 tbsp peanut oil
    1 1/2 lbs boneless pork loin, trimmed and cut into (1/2″) pieces
    1 1/2 cups chopped onion
    4 garlic cloves, minced
    4 cups chicken broth
    2 tbsp sugar
    3/4 tsp salt
    2 15.5-oz cans white hominy, undrained
    sliced radishes
    chopped green onions
    minced fresh cilantro
    lime slices

    Heat a cast-iron skillet over high heat. Place chilies in pan; flatten with a spatula. Cook 10 seconds on each side or until blackened. Combine toasted chilies and 2 cups boiling water in a bowl; let stand 10 minutes or until soft. Place pepper mixture in a blender; process until smooth.

    Cook cumin seeds in a large Dutch oven over medium heat for 1 minute or until toasted and fragrant. Place in a spice or coffee grinder; process until finely ground.

    Heat oil in Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add pork; cook 5 minutes, browning on all sides. Do this in batches if you must — don’t crowd the pork or it’ll steam instead of brown. Remove pork from pan. Reduce heat to medium. Add onion and garlic to pan; cook 8 minutes or until onion is browned, stirring frequently. Stir in pork, pureed chilies, toasted ground cumin, broth, sugar, salt, and hominy; bring to a simmer. Cook 30 minutes or until pork is tender. Spoon equal portions posole into each of 6 bowls; top each serving with radishes, green onions, and cilantro. Serve with lime slices.

    6 Servings

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    posted in Cooking Light, Main Dishes, Mexican, Soups and Stews | 0 Comments

    2nd June 2009

    Catch-Up Post #1: CSA Soup & Asparagus Stir-Fry


    Not sure if it was a major ice-cream headache, weekend trips, or other commitments, but somehow I’ve ended up with a backlog of a dozen or so posts to catch up on.  Rather than try to recreate the magical conversations we had when enjoying these meals, I’m going to post a quick summary of each dish.  That’ll do, pig.

    csasoup

    “CSA” Soup: Delicious!  Lisa made this soup up from all the ingredients we had left over from our last CSA box.  Snow peas, zucchini, broccoli, and shallots, in a tomato and vegetable broth base.  Making a soup is a great way to use up vegetables that are starting to lose their firmness or are a few days away from the compost bin.

    asparagusstirfry

    This stir-fry, originally found on 101 Cookbooks, is a quick-to-prepare mix of tofu, asparagus, mushrooms, and spinach.  We [Heart] Asparagus season!

    Asparagus Stir-Fry
    toasted sesame oil
    8 oz extra-firm tofu, cut into slices
    4 oz mushrooms, halved
    4 green onions, thinly sliced
    1 tbsp freshly grated ginger
    1/2 tsp crushed red pepper flakes
    1/2 bunch of asparagus, trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
    a couple big pinches of fine-grain sea salt
    3 cloves garlic, chopped
    1 big handful of toasted cashews, chopped up a bit
    a few handfuls of spinach
    zest and juice of one lime
    2 tbsp hoisin sauce
    1 small handful fresh mint, slivered
    1 small handful fresh basil, slivered

    Heat a teaspoon or so of sesame oil in a large pan, or well-seasoned wok over medium high heat. When it is hot, add the tofu, and cook until golden – a few minutes. Remove the tofu from the pan and set aside.

    Add a generous splash of oil to the pan and, as soon as it is hot, add the mushrooms, onions, ginger, red pepper flakes, asparagus, and salt. Stir fry for about a minute, then add the garlic, cashews, and spinach and stir-fry for another minute, or until the spinach wilts. Return the tofu to the pan. Stir in the lime zest and juice and the hoisin sauce. Cook for another 10-20 seconds, stirring continuously.

    Remove from heat and stir in the mint and basil. Taste and add a bit more salt if needed.

    2 Main-dish Servings

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    posted in Main Dishes, Soups and Stews | 0 Comments

    24th March 2009

    Kale and Roasted Vegetable Soup

    roastedveggiekale

    Visually appealing? Perhaps not so much, but this soup we adapted from Elise’s Simply Recipes was simply delicious. The roasted vegetables give the soup a nice depth, and we always heart kale!  Lisa’s dad had never tried kale before, so this was a good introduction to this superfood.


    Lisa says:

    Yum! This smells really good. Were you putting extra garlic in there?

    Chris says:

    Heck yeah — in addition to the six cloves the recipe called for, I threw in 6 whole roasted garlic cloves at the end. So you might encounter delicious little flavor gobs.

    Seto says:

    There’s 12 cloves of garlic in here? You really can’t taste it; it’s not overpowering at all — what’s hiding it?

    Chris says:

    Maybe the sweetness from the squash? Also, the garlic cloves are roasted so they’re a lot mellower than usual.

    Lisa says:

    Oh, I forgot, you may not like the squash… it’s sweet. What do you think of kale?

    Seto says:

    I like all these ingredients put together this way in the soup; I can’t tell you what I’d think of the kale separately… but this soup is very good! And I noticed it didn’t take a lot of work…

    Chris says:

    It really didn’t. You spend a lot of time waiting for the veggies in the oven, but actual preparation time is pretty short.

    Lisa says:

    I love soups on days like this when it’s cold and rainy outside!

    Chris says:

    From the look of the forecast, we may be having a lot of soup this week…

    Kale and Roasted Vegetable Soup
    3 medium carrots, peeled and quartered lengthwise
    2 large tomatoes, quartered
    1 large onion, cut into 8 wedges
    1/2 small butternut squash, peeled, seeded, cut lengthwise into 1/2 inch thick wedges
    6 garlic cloves
    1 tbsp olive oil
    6 cups vegetable broth
    4 cups of finely chopped kale
    2 sprigs fresh oregano
    1 bay leaf
    1 15-oz can of Great Northern white beans, drained

    Preheat oven to 400°F. Drizzle a baking sheet with a little olive oil. Arrange carrots, squash, tomatoes, onion, and garlic on sheet. Drizzle with more olive oil. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Toss to coat. Roast vegetables until they are brown and tender, stirring occasionally, about 45 minutes.
    Place garlic cloves (remove papery skin), tomatoes, and onion in a food processor and puree until smooth. Add the puree and the vegetable broth, the kale, oregano, and bay leaf to a large dutch oven. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat. Simmer uncovered until the kale is tender, about 30 minutes.
    Meanwhile, cut squash and carrots into 1/2 inch pieces; set aside. When kale is tender, add carrots, squash, and the drained beans to soup. Simmer 8 minutes, adding more broth to thin soup if necessary. Season with salt and pepper. Discard oregano and bay leaf.

    6 Servings

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    posted in Main Dishes, Vegetarian | 0 Comments


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